Photo of Courtney M. Malveaux

Courtney M. Malveaux is a Principal in the Richmond, Virginia, office of Jackson Lewis. P.C. He co-leads the firm’s Workplace Safety and Health Practice Group and the firm’s Construction Industry Group. His practice focuses on representing employers cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other regulatory agencies, oftentimes following catastrophic incidents.

Mr. Malveaux advises and represents employers in employment law matters, including retaliation claims, employment discrimination, unemployment benefits and wage claims. He also represents business associations in state and federal legislative and regulatory matters, and he has testified before Congressional and state legislative committees on workplace safety  and health matters.

Mr. Malveaux represents industry on the Virginia Safety and Health Codes Board, and pulled together a broad coalition of business and safety associations to pass laws in four states to make voluntary compliance a permanent part of a state Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Before joining Jackson Lewis, Mr. Malveaux enforced occupational safety and health law and other state and federal labor laws as Virginia’s Labor Commissioner while also serving as President of the National Association of Government Labor Officials.

Manufacturing employers continue to feel the brunt of emerging and evolving trends related to the COVID-19 pandemic: workplace safety, labor shortages, absence management, remote technology, and employee retention — just to name a few. Read more.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its COVID-19 guidance for non-healthcare employers, Protecting Workers: Guidance on Mitigating and Preventing the Spread of COVID-19 in the Workplace, on August 13, 2021. Read more.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has offered new COVID-19 guidance indicating that fully vaccinated individuals no longer need to wear masks or maintain physical distance from others in most settings. However, questions about employers’ compliance obligations and general duty expectations under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) remain.