Photo of Courtney M. Malveaux

Courtney M. Malveaux is a Principal in the Richmond, Virginia, office of Jackson Lewis. P.C. He co-leads the firm’s Workplace Safety and Health Practice Group and the firm’s Construction Industry Group. His practice focuses on representing employers cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other regulatory agencies, oftentimes following catastrophic incidents.

Mr. Malveaux advises and represents employers in employment law matters, including retaliation claims, employment discrimination, unemployment benefits and wage claims. He also represents business associations in state and federal legislative and regulatory matters, and he has testified before Congressional and state legislative committees on workplace safety  and health matters.

Mr. Malveaux represents industry on the Virginia Safety and Health Codes Board, and pulled together a broad coalition of business and safety associations to pass laws in four states to make voluntary compliance a permanent part of a state Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Before joining Jackson Lewis, Mr. Malveaux enforced occupational safety and health law and other state and federal labor laws as Virginia’s Labor Commissioner while also serving as President of the National Association of Government Labor Officials.

Employers wondering whether Virginia is the new California just got their answer: California has some catching up to do.

In a split vote, the Virginia Safety and Health Codes Board (which includes author Courtney Malveaux) passed a first-in-the-nation standard to address COVID-19 in workplaces. Virginia Occupational Safety and Health (VOSH), the state’s version of the

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued guidance for construction industry employers to prevent spread of COVID-19.

In addition to measures the agency suggests for all employers, the guidance includes a variety of preventive measures at construction sites, such as:

  • Using Environmental Protection Agency-approved cleaning chemicals from List N or that have

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has published new guidance requiring employers covered by OSHA’s recordkeeping standards to determine whether employees have contracted COVID-19 while at work.

In an effort “to provide certainty to employers and workers,” beginning on May 26, 2020, the agency is requiring all employers to record all COVID-19 cases that:

With many restaurants limited to offering food and beverage carryout and curbside pickup options because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has published guidelines suggesting best practices to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

To prevent exposures with customers, OSHA recommends that food and beverage vendors:

  • Avoid direct hand-offs when possible;

Construction workers received guidance on best practices in preventing the spread of novel coronavirus from New York City. The city has recognized that ordinary practices at construction sites – shared tools, huddled shift meetings and packed schedules with varied trade contractors – can present unique dangers at construction sites.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration